The Serpent’s Egg

Film stills

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kad gyvenimas dar baisesnis nei sapnas.

 

 
Ingmar Bergman’s The Serpent’s Egg follows a week in the life of Abel Rosenberg, an out-of-work American circus acrobat living in poverty-stricken Berlin following Germany’s defeat in World War I. When his brother commits suicide, Abel seeks refuge in the apartment of an old acquaintance Professor Veregus. Desperate to make ends in the war-ravaged city, Abel takes a job in Veregus’ clinic, where he discovers the horrific truth behind the work of the strangely beneficent professor and unlocks the chilling mystery that drove his brother to kill himself.
 

Ingmar Bergman

Ingmar Bergman (1918–2007) was born in Uppsala, Sweden. He studied at Stockholm University, while his professional career started in the Municipal Theater in Helsinborg. Throughout six decades of his cinematic work he created more than 50 films. The importance of Ingmar Bergman to the development of film cannot be overestimated. He is one of the great artistic explorers of the possibilities of the silver screen.